Overcoming Institutional and Organizational Barriers to Sanitation

Overcoming Institutional and Organizational Barriers to Sanitation

Sanitation remains a major challenge of our time, especially in the rapidly growing cities of Africa and Asia. According to the United Nations, “in 2015, 29 per cent of the world’s population lacked a safely managed drinking water supply and 61 per cent lacked safely managed sanitation services. “Lack of sanitation is a major threat to public health, the environment and development. Sanitation comprises a chain of activities ranging from private hygiene practices to waste collection, treatment and disposal, through a networked or unnetworked system. For the first time, the United Nations has set a specific sanitation target with Goal 6 on sustainable development. According to goal 6.2, all countries should “by 2030, ensure access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all, and end open defecation, paying particular attention to the needs of women and girls and people in vulnerable situations”. Sanitation is a particularly complex subject, as it involves a large number of actors, a diversity of technologies, develops in public and private spaces, and is based on individual / collective behaviours based on an intimate practice that is taboo and not very flexible.

4th scientific meeting – posponed March 2021